Things To Do

Llanwrthwl Village Visit

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suitable-for-walking

Llanwrthwl lies on the River Wye south of Rhayader. To the north west is the RSPB nature reserve called Carngafallt, a heather clad hill with slopes clothed in beautiful ancient hanging oak woodlands and thorn scattered fridd. Gafallt was King Arthur’s dog, and legend says that he left his paw print in a stone somewhere on Carngafallt. It was also here that a second hoard of gold jewellery was found – a set of bronze age torques, now in the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff. In the churchyard next to the parish church of St Gwrthwl is a huge standing stone.


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Distance from town centre: 4

The Hall at Abbey-Cwm-Hir

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The Hall at Abbey-Cwm-Hir
The Hall, Abbey-Cwm-Hir, Llandrindod-Wells, Powys, LD1 6PH

Abbey Cwm Hir Hall The Hall at Abbey-Cwm-Hir is a Gothic Victorian Mansion 7 miles north of Llandrindod Wells within a setting


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Opening Times: Variable- Please phone to book
Entry Cost: £16.00pp for guided tour of house, £5.00 children up to age 12, £5.00pp gardens only
Contact: Paul Humpherston
Tel: 01597 851727

Gothic Victorian Mansion with oustanding architecture, stunning interiors, fascinating collections and 12 acres of beautiful gardens

Distance from town centre: 11

Nantmel Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
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Nantmel Show Rhayader Mid Wales Events

Nantmel means ‘Mael’s Valley’, Mael was a prince in the Dark Ages.  It is a very large parish that includes the settlements of Nantmel Village itself, Doldowlod, Gaufron (Geufron), Gwystre, Nant-glas and the Ysfa. It covers nearly fourteen thousand acres and has a population approaching seven hundred. The highest point is the top of Camlo Hill, with an excellent panorama of the Carneddau, Mynydd Epynt and most of the Brecon Beacons to the south and to the north on a clear day it is claimed that Cader Idris can be seen.


Distance from town centre: 5

Rhayader & Elan Valley Angling Association

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pets-welcome
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Mid Wales outdoor activites
Hafod House, East Street, Rhayader LD6 5DS

Wales, and in particular mid-Wales, has always been one of Britain's premier fishing areas, and Rhayader is at the heart of the "Lakeland of Wales". Rhayader is a small market town on the banks of the river Wye and is at the gateway to the spectacular Elan Valley in the Cambrian Mountains.


Contact: Alan Lewis
Tel: 01597 810383

By entering the Rhayader and Elan Valley Angling Association's website, you will have found an angler's paradise at prices that are hard to beat. (Concessions for OAP's / Disabled / Juniors).

Fly-fishing only is available in the beautiful Elan Valley. A series of dams has formed four reservoirs with a total area of 850 acres, supporting a good head of wild brown trout. Also the Claerwen Reservoir, 900 acres of wild brown trout fishing.

The Association owns Llyngwyn, a 16-acre spring fed natural lake in quiet surroundings, with private car park at the lakeside. Three boats are available for anglers. The lake is stocked regularly throughout the year with rainbow trout, and there is also a good stock of brown trout. Carp fishing is also allowed on part of the lake. Almost daily, red kites can be seen hovering above.

The Elan Valley reservoirs and Llyngwyn Lake are Troutmaster waters.

For the angler who is looking for river fishing, the Association has five miles of the river Wye for salmon, brown trout and grayling; two miles of the river Elan for brown trout, grayling, pike and some coarse fish; and three miles of the river Marteg (a tributary of the Wye) for brown trout and two miles of the Claerwen River for wild brown trout fishing.


outdoor activites_Mid Wales Outdoor activities_Rhayaderoutdoor activites_Cambrian Mountains

Elan & Claerwen Valleys

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pets-welcome
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suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Craig Goch Elan Valley Dams

To the west of Rhayader is the Elan Valley Estate, owned by Welsh Water and managed by the Elan Valley Trust, the series of reservoirs set in the outstanding scenery of the Elan and Claerwen Valleys have created a home for wildlife and a place to inspire us all.


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Walking: With 72 sqaure miles of Elan Valley Estate, walking routes in this our part of the Cambrian Mountains is spectacular. See a selection of the Elan Valley walks here.

History: In the 19th century, at the time of the Industrial Revolution Joseph Chamberlain, then leader of Birmingham City Council, set about finding a clean water supply for the City.

The Elan and Claerwen Valleys had been identified by the engineer James Mansergh as having the best potential for water storage - with
• An average annual rainfall of 72 inches (1830mm). 
• Narrow downstream valleys which made building the dams easier. 
• Impermeable bedrock preventing the water seeping away. 
• Altitude - the area is mostly higher than Birmingham enabling the water to be transported by gravity alone, without the need to be pumped.

An Act of Parliament was passed for the compulsory purchase of the area and in 1893 the building work began. Over 100 occupants of the Elan Valley had to move, only landowners received compensation payments. Many buildings were demolished, among them 2 manor houses, 18 farms, a school and a church (which was replaced by the corporation as the Nantgwyllt Church).

A railway line was constructed to transport the workers and thousands of tonnes of building material each day and a village of wooden huts was purpose built to house many of the workers on the site of the present Elan Village.
The Elan Valley Dams were officially opened by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra on 21st July 1904, and the later built Claerwen Dam was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1952.

Present Day: The dams and reservoirs of the Elan Estate are situated within an area of outstanding scenic beauty. They provide a lasting amenity in their own right for visitors to enjoy. The protection of the water catchment area to prevent pollution of the reservoirs has safeguarded the habitats of numerous species of flora and fauna and now the 70 square miles of moorland, bog, woodland, river and reservoir are of national importance for their diversity of lower plants (ferns, mosses, lichens and liverworts) and the Estate is the most important area for land birds in Wales.

Distance from town centre: 3

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